The Horse Who Never Came Home

Posted on June 1, 2018 by Jerrilee.
Categories: history, military, riding.

Guest Article by Stan Isaacs: The Mystery of Paul Revere’s Horse

Revere was an on-call messenger for the American colonies. As immortalized in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem “Paul Revere’s Ride” (it is full of inaccuracies, but it is a [great] public relations coup for Revere) our hero was a 40-year-old silversmith. He was taken in a rowboat on the night of April 18, 1785, across the Charles River from Boston to Charlestown. He took off on a borrowed horse of Deacon Larkin and rode almost 13 miles toward Concord, warning colonists along the way that the British were coming. He was captured outside of Lexington where a British major ordered him to give his horse to a sergeant.
“I dismounted,” Revere wrote in one of his three diaries, “the Sarjint mounted on my horse…and they told me they should make use of my horse for the night, and rode off down the road.” The noble beast disappeared into the British army and was never heard from again.
I visited the Massachusetts State Archives in Boston. They told me that the name of Revere’s horse was the question most often asked by children. The people there gave me a pained look when I mentioned Revere’s horse. I was turned over to Leo Flaherty, the head archivist. He said, “If only people would pay as much attention to important matters as they do to unimportant ones.”    This did not go down well with me you can be sure. I said, “Gee, if kids can get interested in history by learning the name of Paul Revere’s horse then they could go to the so-called important things.”

My pursuit led me as well to the Public Record Office at Kew outside London. I came upon the handwritten diary of the “Sarjint” who had taken Revere’s horse. It was a bit of a trial to decipher his handwriting on the parchment, but I could conclude that he made no mention of being given a name when handed the horse by Revere.
Upon thinking about it, that was a logical dead end because the horse was a borrowed one. It was unlikely Revere would have known its name and even if he had been told it by Larkin, it is unlikely he would have passed the name on to the British.
The trail led back to the Deacon Larkin, the owner of the horse. He, if anybody, would have known the name. That led to the one legitimate claim for the name of the horse. That name is: Brown Beauty.

This comes from a thin book entitled “Some Descendants of Edward Larkin” (Knickerbocker Press, 1930) by William Ensign Lincoln. It states, “Samuel Larkin, born Oct. 22, 1701, died Oct. 8, 1784; he was a chairmaker, then a fisherman and had horses and stable. He was the owner of Brown Beauty, the mare of Paul Revere’s ride…The mare was loaned at the request of Samuel Larkin’s son, Deacon John Larkin, and was never returned to her owner.”

Courtesy:TheColumnists.com

 

no comments yet.

Leave a comment

Names and email addresses are required (email addresses aren't displayed), url's are optional.

Comments may contain the following xhtml tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>




equi-works

equi-works