Do Your Own Wormer Test!

Posted on December 12, 2017 by Jerrilee.
Categories: Uncategorized.

From the Mid-America Agricultural Research Lab:

Finally a do-it-yourself home test for equine intestinal worms. Further understanding of the types of worms and their appropriate dewormer can be found in our equi-works articles on dewormers.

 

 

1. Fecal samples can be stored for long periods if refrigerated (not frozen).
2. Sugar solution is prepared by adding 1 lb. of sugar into 12 fluid oz. (355 ml) of hot water; stir until all sugar is dissolved.
3. Slides can usually be placed in the refrigerator for several days prior to reading.
4. Identify parasites present: +(1-10 eggs/sample) ++(11-50 eggs/sample) +++(over 50 eggs/sample)
5. # of eggs found x 150 = # of eggs per pound feces
6. Materials needed: a. Sugar solution plus dispensing bottle, gun, or syringe
b. Tea strainer
c. 3 oz. and 5 oz. Dixie cups
d. Tongue depressors
e. Taper-bottom test tubes
f. Test tube rack
g. Standard microscope slides

 

Remembering the Pit Pony

Posted on September 29, 2017 by Jerrilee.
Categories: Uncategorized.

An article from: Making Sense of Mining
pitpony3
Horses have been used for many years in different industries to help provide power or transportation. Coal mining was no exception, with horses used to transport coal from the pit site to local users. Horse-powered engines (gins) were commonly used both in agriculture and in mining. They were used in some cases to replace manual winding up and down shafts, the horses being able to lift
heavier loads and for longer periods. The use of steam power, firstly for pumping and later for winding coal and men, had an impact on horse use at the pit surface. Steam winding was used extensively by the 1840s, but in common with many other pit innovations, older gins continued to be used at some small mines well into the twentieth century. After the 1842 Act which prevented
children under the age of 10 and women from working underground, horses and ponies were used more to pull tubs of coal and materials
underground, where roof heights allowed. Gradually, though, much of this work was done by haulage engines, particularly on long, straight roadways.
pitpony2
The number of working ponies reached a peak just before World War I, with 70,000 ponies in 1913. After this the number declined, firstly due to the demands of the War, and after that, as more machines were introduced. This meant that by 1932, only 32,000 ponies were used by mines. In 1947, the coal industry in the UK was nationalised. This made the process of modernisation quicker, and so fewer ponies were needed. By 1962, only 6,400 ponies were used underground, and the number continued to drop. In 1978 there were only 149 ponies employed to work underground. A very small number of mines continued to employ ponies until the 1990s.
pitpony1

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