Bejing Recycled Their Horse Waste

Posted on May 25, 2018 by Jerrilee.
Categories: equipment, health, history.

From FEI newsroom 8/8/2008

Did you know that during the Olympic Games held in Beijing in 2008, 100% of the Olympic stables waste was be recycled? More than 30 tons of waste was processed on a daily basis during their equestrian games. How was this accomplished? According to their files:

Recycling of Stable Waste, in steps earthworm vermicomposting
The rudimentary basics are as follows:
· Stable wastes are collected, including horse manure, food waste and bedding (straw, wood shavings and old newspapers)
· Transported to the recycling plant
· Loaded on to inspection belt
· Treated with hydroprocessors, which mix water with waste tor educe toxic substances, e.g. heavy metals
· Water separated back out from blended waste by filter presses
· Resulting sludge stored and cured for ten days
· Sludge transferred to beds as food for earthworms
· Earthworm waste sinks to the bottom of the bed and is collected every three to four days as organic fertiliser
The benefits
· Relieves pressure on landfills
· Lessens the Greenhouse effect
· Full circle – Organic fertiliser can be used n the turf asnd gardens at the HKJC racecourses, as well as at local organic farms and households

This was tested during the Good Luck Beijing HKSAR 10th Anniversary Cup Eventing competition in August 2007 which served as a test event for the 2008 Olympic equestrian events. Each day, 10 tons of waste from the Olympic stables was sent to the recycling plant where it was fed to earthworms and recycled into organic fertiliser.

Re-use of Environmentally friendly Materials
During construction of the Olympic equestrian venues, environmentally friendly and recycled materials were used wherever possible:
· Stables – engineered wood made from sustainable bamboo was used for construction, whole recycled tires transformed for internal walkways in the stabling complex.
· Cross country course – recycled telegraph poles found new use as poles for some of the fences

Conservation
Trees
· During construction, 90% of trees at the Hong Kong Sports Institute were retained in their original positions, while others were transplanted to different areas of the site
·
500 new trees and around 17,000 shrubs were planted at both the cross country and core venues
Sand
The fine quarry sand and imported geotextiles and fibres for the arena footing? Selected scientifically so that their use created no harm to the environment.
Energy Saving
· Air-conditioning and lighting systems in the stabling complex brought energy savings up to 30% compared with conventional installations.
· Lighting systems in the main arena and training arenas are specially designed to be energy efficient.

photo:news.gov.hk

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